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in a recession in previous decades, might not be a bad thing. >>> detroit's bankruptcy has sent off a huge legal battle over pensions that it owes its workers. many other american cities have so-called underfunded pensions. some are leaning on taxpayers to make up the difference. i'll show you how charleston, west virginia, is raising revenues and cutting costs so it can pay its pensions. >> reporter: the city is about to impose .005 cents sales tax and is charging everyone a $2 a week fee. >> we've got that story and much more as real money continues. keep it right here. antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. >> bankruptcy hearings resumed in detroit and has folks i with underfunded pensions worried. that's forcing some local governments to turn to taxpayers who were not supposed to be on the hook for pensions to shell out more money. reporting on one west virginia city taking extraordinary steps to stay out of bankruptcy and to keep those pensioners paid. >> reporter: charleston, west virginia, fi
not be a bad thing. >>> detroit's bankruptcy has sent off a huge legal battle over pensions that it owes its workers. many other american cities have so-called underfunded pensions. some are leaning on taxpayers to make up the difference. i'll show you how charleston, west virginia, is raising revenues and cutting costs so it can pay its pensions. >> reporter: the city is about to impose .005 cents sales tax and is charging everyone a $2 a week fee. >> we've got that story and much more as real money continues. keep it right here. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? it drives discussion across america. share your story on tv and online. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by readin
-- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> bankruptcy hearings resumed in detroit and has folks i with underfunded pensions worried. that's forcing some local governments to turn to taxpayers who were not supposed to be on the hook for pensions to shell out more money. reporting on one west virginia city taking extraordinary steps to stay out of bankruptcy and to keep those pensioners paid. >> reporter: charleston, west virginia, first responders dealing today with a barricaded gunman. after 20 years on the job they have access to healthcare and are guaranteed generous pensions. >> oh, it's sweet. you could retire with $50,000 a year for life. >> reporter: but the residents are dealing with the payout that could easily exceed $1 million for each retiree. there the is so little fun that they're dipping in their general fund to keep the pensioners paid, and that general fund used to pay for street keening and salaries. >> we were paying 8% of our budgets into these retirement pensions. now we're paying 11.3% and it will go out. >> reporter: the mayor stopped pay out to the p
of despair looms large over motown, detroit's next mayor will be former hospital chief mike duggin or the man we'll meet this morning, wayne county sheriff benny napoleon. august 27th, this is "the daily rundown." lets get to my first reads of the morning. secretary of state john kerry laid out an aggressive case for intervention in syria arking evidence of the largest chemical attack in decades is undeniable. the latest escalation with a steady drum beat by the united states and its allies, which is clearly a leadup to military action. >> the killing of women and children and innocent bystanders by chemical weapons is a moral obscenity. president obama has made clear to the outside regime that this international norm cannot be violated without consequences. >> it's an important phrase. you heard it a lot, not just from john kerry but jay carney, international norm, significant, ready for strike significant on three main tracks, one, intelligence community backing up conclusions the chemical attack was launched by the regime. that could happen as early as today. two, determination of a legal
. but will the sentence ever be carried out? >>> and dogs running wild in detroit. the new problem facing america's largest bankrupt city. >>> and honey booboo's big day. [ male announcer ] this store knows how to handle a saturday crowd. ♪ [ male announcer ] the parking lot helps by letting us know who's coming. the carts keep everyone on the right track. the power tools introduce themselves. all the bits and bulbs keep themselves stocked. and the doors even handle the checkout so we can work on that thing that's stuck in the thing. [ female announcer ] today, cisco is connecting the internet of everything. so everyone goes home happy. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share
to death. >>> and dogs running wild in detroit. the new problem facing america's largest bankrupt city. >>> and honey booboo's big day. [ male announcer ] this store knows how to handle a saturday crowd. ♪ [ male announcer ] the parking lot helps by letting us know who's coming. the carts keep everyone on the right track. the power tools introduce themselves. all the bits and bulbs keep themselves stocked. and the doors even handle the checkout so we can work on that thing that's stuck in the thing. [ female announcer ] today, cisco is connecting the internet of everything. so everyone goes home happy. >>> our second story outfront, the decision to go to war. president obama said tonight he has not yet determined whether or not to strike syria but he did lay out his justification for u.s. involvement. >> when you start talking about chemical weapons in a country that has the largest stock pile of chemical weapons in the world where over time their control over chemical weapons may erode, where they lied to terrorist organizations that have targeted the united states, then there is a
. >> other playoff baseball the tampa bay rays lost to the angels. oakland beat detroit. braves won again and the pirates lost to the brewers. >> come on pirates. >> went 3 for 4, two rbis in my softball game. >> you laid down a couple doubles? >> i hit a couple, no one. >> did they bring out the respirator? >>> let's go to the u.s. open. 296th ranked victoria duval stunned samantha stoeser. it is her first win against a top 20 opponent. her family comes from haiti. her father was actually buried in the rubble in the earthquake three years ago and had to be dug out of the rubble. >> that's an incredible story. >>> more drama from the new york jets camp. the team signed former green bay packers quarterback. he was released after losing out to vince young in green bay for the number two spot. harrell expected to report with the team today. another quarterback joins on the jets roster. rex says he may not make anyone a starter until opening day, day of the game. bring in more quarterbacks. >>> still ahead on "morning joe" governor rick snyder joins us ahead of tomorrow's special show in detr
, a debt overhang discourages new capital from coming in. if you don't know, think of detroit. would you lend to detroit today? you wouldn't. you would want to find out what happens to others who lend to detroit. there is the longer-term agenda. that has to do with potential growth. that speaks to education. it speaks to some micro things that we should be doing. one of the problems of the fed being the center of attention is it diverts discussion away from other things. there is this whole set of other things that are more important for us and for the next generation, that this whole narrative have shifted away from. >> as chief of the white house global council of economics, what types of new projects are you working on? >> you have promoted me. [laughter] i am grateful to be chair of the council on global development. the notion is very simple. part of securing u.s. national security and economic future and living in a global neighborhood that is more prosperous. it has had numerous advantages. the idea is to contribute and bring in outside perception. we are a council made of people
less for you. big thunderstorm complex diving down towards michigan. get ready in detroit. 6:00 to 7:00 a.m. in detroit. rain and thunderstorms heading your way. unsettled in new england. look at the middle of the country. this is as hot as it gets for this time of year. >> summertime still in effect. thank you, bill. >>> concerns over syria push stocks below the 15,000 mark and could cause gas prices to rise. >>> plus, a measles outbreak is causing major concerns. you're watching "first look" on msnbc. if you're seeing spots before your eyes, it's time for aveeno® positively radiant face moisturizer. [ female announcer ] aveeno® with soy helps reduce the look of brown spots in 4 weeks. for healthy radiant skin. aveeno®. naturally beautiful results. aveeno®. nascar is ab.out excitement but tracking all the action and hearing everything from our marketing partners, the media and millions of fans on social media can be a challenge. that's why we partnered with hp to build the new nascar fan and media engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and sto
people may not know his speech originated in part in detroit. explain what dr. king was saying two months before. guest: yes, i'm from detroit and i grew up there. with aretha franklin's father and many other prominent ministers in detroit. dr.king participated in a huge march in detroit leading down near cobal hall where he delivered a similar speech and he talked about using our resources to make sure justice will be delivered. he talked about some of the same things he did in washington. he also talked about obviously detroit being the headquarters of a tremendous labor movement with u.a.w. the local focus in terms of negro rights was extraordinarily powerful. so dr. king founded some of those things but of course took them to a new level in washington. host: from june of 1963 two months before the march on washington. this is put together from motown records. >> i have a dream this afternoon. my four little children will not come up in the same young days that i came up. they will be judged on the basis of the content of their character and not the color of their skin. i have a dre
tonight in detroit. tigers slugger miguel cabrera may have been impressed with oakland's hitting in the series. the a's jumped on detroit starter doug fister in the second. curt sushgszuki puts the a's up two nothing, his first start since joining the league last weekend and pitching for the first time since april 29th. brett anderson pitched the final inning allowing runs. oakland pounded out 21 hits inclouding two home runs from brandon moss. his three-run shot in the 8th puts oakland up 14 to 1. moss had a career high six rbi, and the a's win 14 to 4. >>> pablo sandoval giving hunter pence a quick sal sa dancing lesson. looking good. including buster posey to end the 6th. tied at one when the rockies played four runs, two on former giant ground rule double. colorado would hang onto win 5 to 4. >>> it is time for your wednesday night top five. mets andrew brown pops up to phillies catcher. nobody is covering third. eric young, jr., tags up and moves up for the stolen base. >>> at no. 4, atlanta center fielder b. j. up ton with the 9th diving catch to rob cleveland's carlos sant
a raider flying over a car, if you can believe that, and brandon moss is taking flight in detroit as the [ female announcer ] when you asked us to remove high fructose corn syrup from yoplait original and light, we were like, "sure. no problem!" and you were like, "thanks, but what about thick & creamy and whips!" and we were like, "done and done! now it's out of everything yoplait makes." and you were all, "yum!" and we're like, "is it just us, or has this been a really good conversation?" and you were like, "i would talk, but my mouth is full of yogurt." yoplait. it is so good! or how to find big savings on the things you need. just make a straight line to safeway. your club card gets you deals you can't find anywhere else. load up the cooler. your favorite pepsi products are just $2.47 a 12-pack. charmin is $11.99 for 24 double rolls. and make it a giant scoop. breyers ice cream is only $2.88. real big deals this week and every week. only at safeway. ingredients for life. the a's have spent the past month desperately searching for offense. they found a whole bunch tonight in de
searching for offense. they found a whole bunch tonight in detroit. great to see the maui boy back and productive. his first r.b.i since rejoining them last week. a's with a 2-0 lead in the second inning. but the flood gates really open. it is courtesey of brandon moss with four of the a's 21 hits. it tied a season high. moss' 23rd homer of the year. high, deep and aloha means goodbye. it is six r.b.i's for moss. 14-1 and brett anderson returns after missing two months with a stress fracture. he went three innings and gave up three runs. he records the final out. a's stay two and a halfback because the rangers also won. the giants and rockies, 1-1 in the 6th. rosario knocks bumgarner from the game with a single here. rockies built a 5-1 lead. he took a no hitter into the seventh. hunter pence and he will get nothing and leak it. he will break up the no-no after six and two-thirds. that's the deepest he has taken a no hitter. the joints would rally late, but ultimately fall 5-4 in denver. fresh off a four gold medals in the olympics and five more in the recent championships missy fr
, in chicago, detroit, philadelphia, and all over this nation, the black masses are on the march for jobs and freedom. >> in the five decades since, john lewis has become an icon of the civil rights movement, a hero who faced down brutal southern police in the name of freedom and was beaten bloody for daring to do so. today, he is a 14-term congressman from georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got
for detroit. 20 10 air cargo threat as well as other plots that were effectively mitigated. some more international in scope and origin like the christmas they plot was involved a nigerian citizen who purchased his ticket in ghama,. flew from legos to amsterdam and attended to ignite a bomb en route to america. that attempted attack, we learned that relevant information possessed by u.s. customs and border protection needed to be available overseas at the last point of departure for the united states. we fixed that. we learned that our adversaries were moving to nonmetallic devices. we adapted our screening technology and tactics to counter that. learned that a single vulnerability in any part of the aviation system can make everyone connected to it vulnerable. since we don't control security at foreign airports, we have to work even more closely with international partners to raise the overall security of the system. we did that. shortly after the christmas day plot, i launched a worldwide initiative to make these needed changes in close collaboration with our strongest allies. i am
managers with the power to set aside elected governments most famously in the largest city, detroit. pennsylvania governor tom corbett, so unpopular may not run for election in 2014, pushed forth a law disenfranchising voters prompting the court to smack it down. equally unpopular governor rick scott refuses to budge on the state's stand your ground law trying a second percentage of the voter rolls, no likely that legitimate voters will be bumped off the roles. governor kasich in ohio signed new restrictions on reproductive rights. the governor in maine, education andy, a included state funding for religious schools. list goes on and on. far right republican governor implementing agendas. north carolina, its governor, pat mccrory promised if he won, which he did last november, he wouldn't sign any new abortion restrictions into law. he did just that putting his signature on a bill last month that tucked those restrictions into a motorcycle safety measure. this week mccrory signed a bill into law that takes voter suppression to a whole new level. north carolina's new voter law requir
in detroit, protecting the pensions of people attacked by a financial manager. they were affected by the changes of what took place in detroit. they've been spending a lot of time trying to straighten that out. >> a reminder 50 years ago this was a march for jobs and freedom, organized largely by a. phillip randolph, the great labor leader and the issue of union rights, labor rights, workers rights has always been deeply interconnected with civil rights in this country. >> there's no question about it. the unions are a little nervous as this continuing attack on collective bargaining, continual attack and the introduction of legislation in right to work states, this is being introduced. local elections are taking ahold and attacking workers and depressing wages. this is a big part of what afsme has been focusing on. they're at the pinnacle of the fight right now of what's going on in michigan. >> it's almost impossible to imagine how we can talk about closing a racial inequality gap without also talking at the exact same time about the economic equality that is so critical in our
-free municipal bond, but does detroit give you cause for concern? and other cities across the country that are in similar condition? >> well, i wouldn't touch the cities. you've got to do your homework. so, cities, whether it is harrisburg or detroit or stockton, california, they're are a number of cities you've got to get under the hood and look at the credits but if you look at the highest grade, quality tax-free bond today, they're out there with the yields between 4 and 5% and they're not city credits. they're not detroit's. when that analysis is done, at our present tax structure the taxable equivalent yield is about nine. where are you going to get nine in a liquid investment of very high credit quality? i don't see very much of it. so we shifted allocation to tax-free bond. ashley: very good. do your homework. always good advice. david kotok, thank you so much for joining us. we appreciate it. >> thank you. lori: let's take a specific look at the market because the gains thus far are evaporating slightly. lauren simonetti joins us from the floor of the stock exchange. you're wa
detroit. >> right. >> well, detroit is a great symbol of failure. anyway, thank you, glenn thrush. thanks for giving us the idea for the piece. what he is going took tomorrow about economic inequality, not just racial inequality. >>> up next, bachmann's stand. we're talking about michele bachmann. a new ebook just came out. more trouble for her. her staff is in revolt. even her own people on coming out against her on her way out. this is "hardball," the place for politics. ols... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ [ crisp crunches ] [ rumbling ] [ crisp crunches ] whoo-hoo-hoo! guess it was. [ male announcer ] pringles, bursting
'donnell. would rain put a damper on the a's it detroit? and get your tape measures out. this was big in dinver. wait until you see -- in denver. wait until you see it coming up. ,, ,,,,,,,,,,,, unbelievable. shhhhh! in our day, we didn't have u-verse high speed internet. yeah, our babysitter didn't have a million ways to serve mom up on a silver platter. we had to count sheep to fall asleep. and i always worried that i was creating an overcrowded sheep farm. in my head... never looked like that farmer took proper care of those sheep. too much? a little. [ male announcer ] connect all your wi-fi-enabled devices with u-verse high speed internet. and got an unexpected visita 350 pound blue marlin that t >>> a close call in the dominican republic where fishermen hooked a 350-pound blue marlin that leaped on the boat nearly spearing a crew member. they usually release the marlins but because this died on board the crew gave it to a local fisherman. >> that was a close call, though. >> wow. >>> good morning, everybody. justin verlander beat the a's twice in the play-offs last year. well, last night
is assessing facebook. >> and i'm dennis o'donnell. would rain put a damper on the a's' bats in detroit? get your tape measures out. this was big in denver. wait until you see it coming up. >> what's cool about your school? you can submit your nomination at our website, kpix.com/coolschool. we may come out and feature your school on the show. we'll be right back. >>> good morning, everybody. justin verlander beat the a's twice in the play-offs last year. well, last night redemption and a chance to up their wild card lead. verlander needed 44 pitches to get out of the 1st inning alone. he wasn't good. brandon moss would agree. tied at 3 in the 5th inning moss launches one the other way off the former american league mvp. a's take a 5-3 lead. they had the baze loaded nobody out in the --bases loaded nobody out in the 6th inning. the rain started falling. the game was called and the a's will take it. they win 6-3. two straight now over detroit. >>> hunter pence almost sent himself to the disabled list crashing into the wall a couple of days ago. last night he hits the longest home run in the ma
is focusing on detroit. a city that is gone through incredible pain. and this is an opportunity for those of us who believe this is the greatest country in the world for people to have the opportunity to become all that they can be. we can go to detroit and it's a city where we which party has run that city for the past 50 years and we can propose different solutions, solutions . sed on our free enterprise strongly encouraging enterprise zones in detroit but we need ideas. anyone want to talk to us about detroit, that's where we think is one of the most important places to have an impact and to share in the cause that each of us believe. it's an honor to be with you all to share some words. i appreciate the opportunity. and god bless you. god bless america. thank you. >> thank you. now we will hear from mr. bob woodson sr., founder and president for the center of america.integrated >> good afternoon. the dr. king i remember was a man who was not content with reflecting the majority opinion or the consensus of the majority but he challenged it. we forget that the civil rights movement was
that the dream is far from being realized. with the once mighty city of detroit in the throws of bankruptcy and countless other cities teetering on the brink, there is a fierce urgency to act now. if the big auto makers and major financial institutions were too big and too important to fail, why is not the same true of the major urban centers which are populated by millions of poor blacks and brown and white hung erling for nothing more than a decent job to provide for themselves and their families? why shouldn't his torically black colleges and universities desperate for stability, be given the assistance which will enable them to continue their noble mission of educating both the best, brightest, as well as the least of these. as we struggle to recover from the worst economic calamity since the greaped, america needs a new marshall plan for our city to provide jobs, infrastructure improvements, and a true lasting stimulus to the economy. while we are inspired today by the majesty of power of my father's extra dation of yesterday year we must be mindful of this imperative of love. he thoug
, he did one in 1960 to '61. another in detroit. so he put them all together to deliver this incredible message that moved the nation and our world. >> that crescendo that came at the end, that build, the speech was kind of prosaic, then he started talking my country 'tis of thee from the song. and the references to the bible and shakespeare. "the new york times" today pointed out -- people are going to be studying this for years. the source material of the bible, of shakespeare, of woody guthrie, of the declaration and documents all enriching that one statement. in 17 minutes. >> i mean, that's the brilliance of it. that was the brilliance of who he as an orator was. and "i have a dream" is probably one of the most well-known speeches on the planet. >> around the world. >> around the world. unquestionably. and i think certainly today represented some of that. with all the coverage from rural networks. i've done so many things from bbc that i've ever done in my life. but because of the importance of this message. >> what's it like when you hear him say on tape again my four little child
it in ohio, detroit, pennsylvania. >> they're doing it in texas. >> it would create jobs. so many opportunities for all americans. there is your answer. >> i want to add one point. i lived in atlanta. the day i arrived in atlanta, my first day on the air i got a call from maynar, d jackson. i got to know andrew young, josea williams. martin luther king's driver. i got to know these guys. what they did many the face of such hostility is an amazing profile in courage. what they did made this country better. >> absolutely. >> the president gave a good speech today, bob. one of the best speeches i have heard him give. >> talk about entitlements. unfortunately president obama has only expanded entitlements to make whites, blacks, hispanics more dependent. it's not helping anybody. you and i know more could be done in washington, d.c. it's cultural. when you have a president who is -- i know you don't like him. i don't like what he does. h's a good father, appearingly a good husband. there are no sex scandals. he's there for his kids. his pants are pulled up. he speaks gramattic -- corr
elements. if you look at his speeches from birmingham, wrik wrigly field, cleveland, chicago, detroit, i have a dream and the march on washington is really a culminationef a series of interracial fest valz that summer in which all the elements, many from letters from a birmingham jail-- are reshuffled. when you see the continuities of "i have a dream" even the drea dream-- and king always believed before there was an american dream-- he used to preach this all the time it's slaves had their own dreams. and keep in mind here, doesn't end with the declaration. it's a black man. black slaefs have the last word when he has whites become blacks so we can all experience bondage and deliverance. always conflicted when you look at king's brilliant mixing to miss these other strains of black pride and rebeaut of america. one day, the national will live out, not now. >> rose: clawrns, how did he end up being the last speaker? >> there was a proposal, 10 speers, and each speaker would be allocated five minute. and the proposal was dr. king would be in the middle, that he would be like the fifth or
in new york this morning and spread across to cities like chicago, charlotte north carolina, and detroit. workers say they want to earn $15 an hour, nearly double the current minimum wage. lois is the history professor at cornell university, and she joins us now from ihnica new york. can you hear me now. >> obviously we are having a little difficult with our life feed there. question will try to come back to them later. the justice department says it will not sue the state's of colorado and washington to block them from legalized recreational marijuana use. instead, the government outlines its priorities for enforcing the laws including keeping pot out of the hands of minors and keeping the drug cart tells out. this leaves many trying to figure out how to make money off this newly legal industry. in abatement room, he gives us a small whiff of the future of big weed. >> we won some awards for this, if you smell it you will get -- blueberry cheesecake. >> this is a 500 square feet growing room, but his company is permitted for nearly 20 times that. we help provide over 10,000 patients wit
government must step in to ensure the state and local government. the problem detroit faced is that -- >> state, local, and tribal government. >> and tribal government. [laughter] >> okay. >> the problem with detroit, unlike many municipalities that depend on revenue from real estate tax, they run on income taxes. they never recovered from 2001. the black unemployment rate never recovered from 2001. that downturn decimated the revenue stream for the city, and it never came back. if there are banks that are too big to fail, and we have to step in to make sure they function, there are cities that are too big to fail. [applause] >> bankruptcy in one of those cities. >> yes, and so it is not enough for the administration to say, oh, we're behind you, droit. no. we said to wall street, $800 billion we're behind you, so that's being behind me. [laughter] >> okay. behind you, what are the policies? >> so, wall street caused more damage than what we have put into the budget. there needs to be a financial transaction tax because when they gamble, we lose. [applause] they have to pay
of detroit of their pensions. they worked hard for these pensions. [applause] and let me tell you something, if they, if we stand by while they take the detroiters pensions, they'll be taking our pensions. so don't think it won't happen to us. if they can set a precedent, they'll do it to us again. you know, let me just tell you this: inequality is a scourge on our society. and, yes, we're talking about low-wage workers making $7.25 an hour, we've got to do something about it. but there's the other side of that, the other side of that is that some people are doing pretty good. so between 1979 and 2007, 20, you know, a period of a it little bit less than 20 years, real income rose by 240% for those at the top 1. it's a shameful thing. it is a moral issue. and we have got to fight back at this. let me tell you this, our economy is capable be of producing -- capable of producing enough good paying jobs for everyone. [applause] our economy can do it. this economy can do it. but we can't do it while we're getting trade deals that are shipping our jobs overseas that just leaned on us if a few mon
of detroit in the throws of bankruptcy and countless other cities teetering on the brink, there is a fierce urgency to act now. if the big auto makers and major financial institutions were too big and too important to fail, why is not the same true of the major urban centers which are populated by millions of poor blacks and brown and white hungering for nothing more than a decent job to provide for themselves and their families? why shouldn't historically black colleges and universities desperate for stability be given the assistance which will enable them to continue their noble mission of educating both the best, brightest, as well as the least of these? as we struggle to recover from the worst economic calamity since the great depression, america needs a new marshall plan for our cities to provide jobs, infrastructure improvements, and a true lasting stimulus to the economy. while we are inspired today by the majesty of power of my father's exhortation of yesterday year we must be mindful of this imperative of love. he sought the beloved community where we could live together with peace
't have to look any more at greece and portugal. we can look close by at detroit . folks, that is a picture of where liberal progressive ideas go. detroit was america's premier city. highest per capita income in the country. proud of our country and the auto business there. but then as you had government unions grow and higher taxes, and more regulation, as you saw these liberal progressive ideas that were supposed to help the poor and build a middle class, what have we been left with in detroit? for minorities and the poor? unemployment, about 40%. has it helped children get a better education? only 7% of children in the eighth grade read at the grade level. has it created the prosperity that they talk about when a third of the buildings are empty, where you've got 400ly quor stores and until a few weeks ago not one chain super market in what was america's premier city. folks, it's not a theatrical argument any more. and the states of california and illinois and other states following that policy are not far behind in some form of bankruptcy. our ideas are being show cas
you think martin luther king would be saying about what has unfolded in detroit? >> well, i think obviously he would be very concerned. he would be outraged today that in america, black youth unemployment is close to 40% and real unemployment in this country is 14%. he talked about and led and moved toward that march on washington, that poor people's march at the time that he died, what he was talking about is an economy of full employment. massive investment in job creation and not just for african-americans. he was bringing together hispanics, poor whites and he was saying we have got to stand together and too often, ed, we forget about that aspect about martin luther king jr. and we simply focus on his enormously effective work in desegregating america. >> that day, what was the mood like? if you have to capture the emotion and memory about what that day was like, what would you say? >> enormous optimism, enormous excitement about the fact that so many people of all colors, of all ages came together in washington, d.c. that was unprecedented up until that point. the king speech
find ourselves feeling weaker on the ground in places like detroit and baltimore. >> there's a statistic from the urban institute that i found pretty stunning. over the past 30 years, the average white family has gone from having five times as much wealth as the average black family, to 6 1/2 times. which is to say the wealth disparity between black households and white households is accelerating. what do you -- how do you make sense of that? how do you make sense of that in the context of the racial progress that we've made in so many areas and the fact that we have the first black president? >> well, look, certainly, we have come a long way, and there's a long way to go. and the reality is that the banking industry in many instances, in too many instances, targeted the black community for really strip mining wealth in our communities, through the shenanigans that happened through the mortgage business, during the bubble. and obama started right at the beginning of that. and i think if there's frustration in the community, it's that we haven't seen really folks go to jail
at that. oh, my god. >> that jungle cat is terrorizing residents in this neighborhood in detroit. >> like they don't have enough issues in detroit. >> it's unclear what breed it is or if it is a ferile cat. oh, that is scary. something gray -- gray and black marks and kids in the neighborhood say they are scared. >> i'm going to run, for one. i be scared to walk the neighborhood because it come out on you. it's not scared. >> it ran to me, so i ran. i ran in the house. it was real scary. i said i never going back there again. >> it looks like a cat with really long legs. >> yeah, large cat. >> studies show there are thousands of stray cats roaming detroit. the michigan humane society promises now to investigate. >> you know what works, moth balls. detroit really is reverting to its natural state, you know what i mean? wild animals roaming eating the population. >>> let's check in with janice dean with a look at the weather. >> i haven't spotted any stray cats around here. >> just large rats, new york. >> wow, those can be scary. absolutely. >> more rats than there are people. >> this big
: and it's a dream that still lives on 50 years later. edith drove to d.c. from detroit for this week's commemoration and she brought her granddaughters with her. >> i wanted my granddaughters to see what i saw 50 years ago. to stand up for what's right. >> reporter: the struggles then and those to come draw john lewis back as well. you still come here often. >> oh, yes. >> reporter: why? >> because i come here to reflect, to remember. >> reporter: remembering his old friend, and the day that both made history and changed it. >> this spot is almost sacred. dr. king must be looked upon as one of the founding fathers of the new america. lewis believes america has come far in 50 years. many issues still exist. progress, he says, just a down payment on the dream. what was at stake that day? >> the future of america as one nation. as one people. it was at stake. he helped hold us together. >> reporter: is there one moment from that day that sticks out in your mind most? >> he started saying let freedom ring. let freedom ring. from stone mountain of georgia, let freedom ring. from every mol
gel parent birth rate. failure to graduate. functional ill literacy in detroit. this is a major urban environment and major failure. this is something that shows the world that america has made great strides and americans that made great strides but as a matter of fact we have a need to move into 2013 and take these issues on in our current environment and education it is the civil rights issue today. pause what we do as a nation is we degrade and we lose our culture, our workforce. we lose our ability and america is a land of opportunity. if you are not educated. you can't take advantage of that opportunity. >> chris: you know, 50 years after the march on washington. one of the questions is how long -- well, how much longer the government should give special treatment to minorities. back in 2003, then justice sandra day o'connor was the swing vote in uphogd racial preferences, continued racial preferences in college admissions. but she said that that should end she said back then within 25 years. kirsten, justice o'connor has now backed off that 25 year deadline. at some point does a
, unemployment, failure to graduate, functional illiteracy in detroit. this is a major urban environment. a major failure. this shows the world america has made great strides and americans made great strides but we have a lot of challenges. we need to move into 2013 and take these views on in our current environment. education is the civil rights issue today what we do as a nation is we degrade and we lose our culture, our work force. we lose our ability. america is the land of opportunity. if you're not educated, you can't take advantage of that opportunity. >> you know, 50 years after the march on washington, one of the questions is how much longer the government should give special treatment to minorities? back in 2003 then justice sandra day o'connor was the swing vote upholding continued racial preference necessary college tuition. she said that should end back then in 25 years. she backed off that 25-year deadline. but at some point does affirmative action, does special treatment need to end? >> i think president obama addressed that before saying perhaps we should be looking more at econom
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